Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
jb™

IT'S MUELLER TIME!!!

Recommended Posts

tenor.gif?itemid=10290885

Just wanted to start a thread dedicated to Special Counselor's Investigation into the Trump Campaign and the subsequent Administration. Fake News? Keep telling yourselves that.;)

Let's start with the most recent news.....Rick Gates, Trump Campaign aide, as the latest to plead guilty and willing to cooperate.

Rick Gates, Trump Campaign Aide, Pleads Guilty in Mueller Inquiry and Will Cooperate

By MARK MAZZETTI and MAGGIE HABERMAN

 
Rick Gates, the former deputy chairman of the Trump campaign, arriving at a hearing on Friday at Federal District Court in Washington. Erin Schaff for The New York Times 

WASHINGTON — A former top adviser to Donald J. Trump’s presidential campaign has agreed to cooperate with the special counsel inquiry into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election after pleading guilty on Friday to financial fraud and lying to investigators.

The adviser, Rick Gates, is a longtime political consultant who once served as Mr. Trump’s deputy campaign chairman. The plea deal could be a significant development in the investigation — a sign that Mr. Gates plans to offer incriminating information against his longtime associate and the former Trump campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and possibly other members of the campaign in exchange for a lighter punishment. He faces up to nearly six years in prison.

The deal came as the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, has been raising pressure on Mr. Gates and Mr. Manafort with dozens of new charges of money laundering and bank fraud unsealed on Thursday. Both men were first indicted in October and pleaded not guilty. The plea agreement was part of a flurry of recent activity by the special counsel’s team. Last week, 13 Russians were indicted on charges relating to a carefully planned scheme to incite political discord in the United States in the months before the 2016 election.

Mr. Gates changed his plea on Friday during an appearance in a Washington courtroom, his eyes cast down as the government outlined the charges against him. A man who had made millions of dollars lobbying in Ukraine accepted the fate that may await him: a prison sentence for carrying out a financial conspiracy to hide the money he earned there.

He also admitted that he lied to investigators this month — while under indictment and negotiating with prosecutors — about the details of a 2013 meeting about Ukraine that Mr. Manafort had with a pro-Russian member of Congress.

What the dramatic courtroom scene might mean for President Trump depends on what Mr. Gates has to offer the special counsel, though at the least, the plea agreement is further evidence that the Trump campaign attracted a cast of advisers who overstepped legal and ethical boundaries. The indictments so far have not indicated that either Mr. Gates or Mr. Manafort had information about the central question of Mr. Mueller’s investigation — whether Mr. Trump or his aides coordinated with the Russian government’s efforts to disrupt the 2016 election.

But Mr. Gates was present for the most significant periods of the campaign, as Mr. Trump began forging policy positions and his digital campaign operation engaged with millions of voters on social media platforms such as Facebook. Even after Mr. Manafort was fired by Mr. Trump in August 2016, Mr. Gates remained with the campaign at the request of Stephen K. Bannon, who took over as head of the campaign.

From there, Mr. Gates assumed a different role — as a liaison between the campaign and the Republican National Committee — and traveled aboard the Trump plane through Election Day.

In addition to offering visibility into the Trump campaign, Mr. Gates might be able to provide prosecutors with glimpses into decision-making in the months after Mr. Trump’s election victory. Mr. Gates was a consultant on the transition team, and in the months after the inauguration, he worked with America First Policies, the main outside group supporting the Trump presidency.

Besides the agreement with Mr. Gates, the special counsel’s team has already secured guilty pleas from two of Mr. Trump’s advisers. Michael T. Flynn, the president’s first national security adviser, and George Papadopoulos, a foreign policy aide during the campaign, have both pleaded guilty to lying to the F.B.I. and agreed to cooperate with the inquiry.

Mr. Gates’s plea deal came together over the past few days, according to people familiar with the process. In a letter to friends and family, Mr. Gates said there had been false news stories about an impending plea deal over the past two weeks.

But, he added, “Despite my initial desire to vigorously defend myself, I have had a change of heart. The reality of how long this legal process will likely take, the cost, and the circuslike atmosphere of an anticipated trial are too much. I will better serve my family moving forward by exiting this process.”

[Read our 2017 profile of Rick Gates »]

Testimony from Mr. Gates could give Mr. Mueller’s team a first-person account of the criminal conduct that is claimed in the indictments — a potential blow to Mr. Manafort’s defense strategy. On Friday, Mr. Manafort pledged to continue the fight.

“Notwithstanding that Rick Gates pleaded today, I continue to maintain my innocence,” he said in a statement. “I had hoped and expected my business colleague would have had the strength to continue the battle to prove our innocence. For reasons yet to surface he chose to do otherwise. This does not alter my commitment to defend myself against the untrue piled up charges contained in the indictments against me.”

After Mr. Gates’s plea hearing, prosecutors filed a new indictment against Mr. Manafort. That indictment did not allege new charges against him, but was done for procedural purposes as prosecutors pursue separate cases in Washington and Northern Virginia.

The court papers give few specifics about how Mr. Gates came to be charged with lying to the F.B.I. On Feb. 1, as he was negotiating with prosecutors about a possible deal, Mr. Gates misled investigators about a conversation he had with Mr. Manafort in March 2013, after Mr. Manafort had met with the congressman to discuss the situation in Ukraine. The documents do not name the lawmaker, but news accountshave identified him as Representative Dana Rohrabacher of California, a Republican long known for his pro-Russia views.

Mr. Gates falsely told investigators that Mr. Manafort had told him that the subject of Ukraine had not come up at the meeting, even though Mr. Gates had helped draft a report to Ukraine’s leadership after the meeting about what had transpired, according to the court papers.

Court records detail a byzantine scheme he and Mr. Manafort employed from about 2006 to 2015 in which they funneled millions of dollars they earned from their work as political consultants in Ukraine into shell companies and foreign bank accounts. The men worked in various capacities with Viktor F. Yanukovych, the onetime president of Ukraine and a longtime ally of President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.

They then hid the existence of the companies and accounts — set up in Cyprus, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and the Seychelles — from American tax authorities.

“Gates helped maintain these accounts and arranged substantial transfers from the accounts to both Manafort and himself,” prosecutors argued in the charges against Mr. Gates made public on Friday. Acting on Mr. Manafort’s instructions, Mr. Gates classified the overseas payments as “loans” to avoid having to pay income taxes.

Mr. Mueller’s team found that more than $75 million passed through offshore accounts, and that Mr. Manafort laundered more than $18 million to furnish a lavish, largely tax-free lifestyle. Mr. Gates transferred more than $3 million from the offshore accounts, court documents show.

Mr. Manafort purchased multimillion-dollar homes, expensive clothing, antiques and a Range Rover. Mr. Gates used the money to pay his mortgage and school tuitions, and for the interior decorating of his home in Virginia.

The work the two men did for their firm, Davis Manafort, connected them to numerous people with ties to the Kremlin. One was Oleg Deripaska, an aluminum magnate and an ally of Mr. Putin’s. Mr. Deripaska has been denied a visa to travel to the United States because of allegations that he is linked to organized crime operations, claims he has denied.

Court records unsealed Friday revealed other lobbying schemes, including how Mr. Manafort used offshore accounts to wire more than 2 million euros to pay a group of former senior European politicians to take pro-Ukraine positions and lobby in the United States. In an “Eyes Only” memo that Mr. Manafort wrote in 2012, the purpose of the “Super VIP” effort was to assemble a group of “politically credible friends who can act informally and without any visible relationship with the Government of Ukraine.”

After their Ukraine work was disclosed in news reports in August 2016, when Mr. Manafort and Mr. Gates were working for the Trump campaign, they “developed a false and misleading cover story” to distance themselves from Ukraine, according Mr. Mueller’s prosecutors.

Then, they covered their tracks when reporting their income to the Internal Revenue Service. Two months after Mr. Manafort left the campaign, according to the court documents, his accountant emailed him a question about whether he had any foreign bank accounts.

“None,” he replied.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some more...enjoy!;)

Inside the Manafort money machine: A decade of influence-peddling, lavish spending and alleged fraud

AFP_10W22L-4312.jpg?uuid=zGOLvhjxEeiLCAJ

As Donald Trump crisscrossed the nation promising to drain the swamp, two of his top advisers were busy illegally building a colossal fortress of riches deep inside that swamp, according to federal prosecutors.

For a decade prior and on through Trump’s populist crusade, Paul Manafort and Rick Gates used offshore accounts, hidden income, falsified documents and laundered cash to maintain Manafort’s lush life of multiple homes, fine art, exquisite clothes and exotic travel, the government says.

In a richly detailed expanded indictment filed Thursday, special counsel Robert S. Mueller III parted the curtain shielding how two longtime Washington influence merchants worked the system. The government contends that Manafort, who was Trump’s campaign chairman for five months before being fired, used people all around him, from his buddy Gates to banks, clients and the IRS, to build a life of conspicuous consumption.

Gates, who was Manafort’s deputy in their lobbying firm and on the Trump campaign, pleaded guilty Friday to conspiracy and lying to the FBI, cutting a deal with prosecutors to give them information that could help Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Manafort, meanwhile, has maintained his innocence. His spokesman, Jason Maloni, said that Manafort is “confident that he will be acquitted and violations of his constitutional rights will be remedied.”

An attorney for Gates declined to comment on Thursday’s indictment.

If convicted, Manafort faces punishment that could put him behind bars for the rest of his life. 

But for the years when he was working for Ukrainian leader Viktor Yanukovych, the money poured in by the millions.

From 2006 on, much of it came from Manafort and Gates’s prized client, Yanukovych, and his Party of Regions, which paid their firm $17 million between 2012 and 2014, according to federal filings.

Even after the money stopped flowing, Manafort and Gates found ways — illegal ways, prosecutors say — to maintain and even improve their lifestyles.

After Ukrainians took to the streets in 2014 in an uprising against their government’s corruption, and Yanukovych fled to the protection of his close ally, Russian President Vladi­mir Putin, Manafort and Gates misled banks and borrowed millions, allowing Manafort to live in bigger and better houses, buy fabulous fashions and expand an already impressive collection of antique rugs, prosecutors allege.

With extensive help from Gates, Manafort opened a gusher of spending on personal pleasures, according to the indictment prosecutors filed this week. (Outwardly, Gates, who is 45, lived more modestly, but he, too, had amassed quite a fortune. Although he listed $2.2 million in assets in a court document in 2011, he wrote in a credit application in 2016 that he was worth $25 million and that his wife had assets of $30 million, the indictment says.)

Manafort, a longtime mainstay of Washington politics who tracked delegates for President Gerald Ford’s 1976 campaign and ran Ronald Reagan’s campaign in the South in 1980, and Gates had spent two decades at the pinnacle of Washington’s influence industry, collecting clients such as the Ukrainian leader and other strongmen from Congo, the Philippines and other countries who depended on the duo to advance their interests.

Manafort, 68, was not shy about displaying the fruits of that work. 

The money went, the government says, to home contractors, with $5.4 million going to one on the East End of Long Island, where Manafort had a lavish 10-bedroom spread in tony Bridgehampton. (Manafort has since put that property — along with three others in Manhattan, Palm Beach and Alexandria — up as collateral in his $12 million bail deal with the government.)

Prosecutors say that Manafort made monthly payments to the home improvement company, many of them in six-figure amounts, drawn from accounts that he and Gates controlled in Cyprus and the Grenadines, companies with names such as Global Highway Limited and Lucicle Consultants.

Another $655,000 allegedly went to a Hamptons landscaper over a 2½ -year period. A second landscaper got $165,000 over the following two years.

The indictment describes how money poured into the coffers of the businesses that could turn a house into a state-of-the-art entertainment complex. It alleges that a lighting and home entertainment company in Florida got $1.3 million from five Manafort-controlled entities. Over two years, an antique-rug shop in Alexandria collected $934,000 from Manafort’s Cypriot accounts, prosecutors say. 

Manafort spent $849,000 at one men’s clothing shop in New York City in 34 visits over six years — an average of $25,000 per shopping venture. Another clothing store, in Beverly Hills, collected $520,000 from Manafort on nine dates over five years, about $58,000 per visit.

Manafort allegedly bought Range Rovers (four of them in five years), a Mercedes, art, ­audio-video systems, a condo, a Manhattan brownstone and his Alexandria house. 

He liked to live large and he didn’t mind if others saw how he spent his wealth. He once testified before Congress that although “the technical term for what we do . . . is ‘lobbying’ . . . I will admit that, in a narrow sense, some people might term it ‘influence peddling.’ ”

His friends loved that chesty bravado of his, and some of them called him “the Count of Monte Cristo,” named for the swashbuckling hero of the 19th-century French novel.

But prosecutors describe how much of Manafort’s fortune was not flaunted: Millions were tucked away in an extensive network of foreign companies and bank accounts in Cyprus, the Grenadines and the Seychelles islands. In the lean years that followed the flight of their Ukrainian patron, Manafort and Gates allegedly tapped into their foreign holdings, bringing large sums back home and presenting those transactions not as repatriated assets but as new income — thereby persuading banks to lend them more than $20 million that, prosecutors argue, they otherwise would not have qualified for.

The financial misdeeds that Manafort and Gates have now been accused of have nothing to do with their work for the Trump campaign. Mueller is apparently engaged in a classic prosecutor’s methodology, identifying other crimes committed by people in the orbit of the main subject of the investigation, and then using that evidence to find out if those people have incriminating information about the person prosecutors are really interested in. 

On its face, the indictment filed Thursday is a fairly simple case of alleged tax fraud. A federal law called the Bank Secrecy Act says that if you have accounts in foreign banks — whether the accounts are in your name — you must report them to the U.S. Treasury. 

The IRS’s 1040 tax form asks, “Did you have an interest in or a signature or other authority over a financial account in a foreign country?” Year after year — all the way up to last October — Manafort and Gates repeatedly answered, “No,” when, in fact, the government says, they had extensive foreign interests.

During the fat years when Yanukovych was on the rise and then in power, Manafort and Gates were able to stockpile millions in those foreign entities, prosecutors say. After 2014, when the cascade of money dried up, Manafort and Gates adapted.

Using the real estate Manafort had acquired with their Ukrainian fees as collateral, he — allegedly with Gates’s assistance — took out millions of dollars in mortgages. To get the mortgages, the government contends, Manafort and Gates concocted fake profit and loss statements that inflated their income.

In 2012, Manafort bought a four-story, 19th-century brownstone rowhouse in the Carroll Gardens section of Brooklyn. He paid $3 million in cash — from one of the men’s Cyprus accounts, prosecutors say — for the place on Union Street and set about renovating it from the guts out. The house already had marble mantelpieces and a Jacuzzi, but Manafort took it to a new level, adding a two-story extension out back, new windows, a roof deck and a slate walkway.

Neither Manafort nor his daughter ever moved in. The daughter, according to the New York Times, told neighbors that she loved the place and intended to live in it. As the renovations continued, Manafort took out a $5 million loan, supposedly to pay for the rehabilitation of the house. But Manafort, the government says, actually had no such intention. “The construction mortgage will allow me to pay back [another Manafort apartment] mortgage in full,” he wrote to his tax preparer in December 2015.

Similarly, Manafort in 2012 bought a $2.85 million condo in Manhattan’s pricey Soho neighborhood — also with cash, also from the accounts in Cyprus, the indictment says. For more than two years, he rented the place out on Airbnb, charging several thousand dollars a week, prosecutors say. 

At the same time as he was renting out the apartment, Manafort sought a $3.4 million mortgage on it. To get a loan that large, the bank wanted to see that the condo was occupied by its owner. That’s exactly what Manafort claimed was the case, the government says.

“In order to have the maximum benefit, I am claiming Howard St. as a second home,” Manafort wrote in an email cited by prosecutors. “Not an investment property.”

The email was written in January 2016 — smack in the middle of the period when Manafort was renting out the place on Airbnb.

He told the lender that his daughter and son-in-law were using the condo and that it was not a rental property. And Manafort wrote to his son-in-law to remind him that when the bank’s appraiser showed up to assess the condo, he should “remember, he believes that you and [Manafort’s daughter] are living there.”

But the bank got suspicious, discovering that there was, indeed, a mortgage on Manafort’s Brooklyn brownstone, even though Manafort had written on his loan application that he owned the Brooklyn place free and clear.

Gates responded, prosecutors say, by having an insurance broker send the bank an old insurance report that listed no mortgage on the Union Street rowhouse. Gates emailed Manafort to let him know how he had handled the situation, the indictment says. Within hours, Manafort replied: “good job on the insurance issues.”

Still, it wasn’t clear that the lender was going to approve the loan on the Howard Street condo. There was another problem: A tax return that Manafort included in his application showed that he had received a $1.5 million loan from one of the entities in Cyprus that he and Gates controlled. With that large a debt on Manafort’s record, the bank was hesitant to approve a new loan.

In fact, the government alleges, there never was any loan; the money had just been transferred from Cyprus to the United States, but it had been called a loan so Manafort wouldn’t have to pay taxes on the income.

But now the “loan” was causing a problem, so, prosecutors say, Manafort and Gates had a tax accountant send the lender backdated documents falsely stating that the $1.5 million loan had been forgiven in 2015.

In March 2016, Manafort got a $3.4 million mortgage on the Howard Street condo.

About that same time, Manafort applied to borrow yet more money, this time a business loan. To boost the application’s prospects, prosecutors say, Gates asked a bookkeeper to add $2.4 million to the stated income of their company. “Can you make adjustments on your end and then just send me a new scanned version?” Gates asked in an email.

The bookkeeper refused, the government says, so Gates did it himself. “I am editing Paul’s 2015 P&L statement,” he wrote, sending the altered profit and loss statement to the lender. The loan application claimed that the company Manafort and Gates controlled had $4.45 million in net income; prosecutors say the real income was less than $400,000.

To win approval of the loans, the men needed help from inside the banks. They found what prosecutors call “a conspirator” who worked for one of the lenders. When Manafort and Gates’s loan application first arrived, the lender’s employee wrote back, “Looks Dr’d. Can’t someone just do a clean excel doc and pdf to me??”

The final, successful application included a later and different version of the paperwork.

But sometimes the duo’s methods didn’t work. In 2016, when Manafort applied for a mortgage on his Bridgehampton house, he told the bank that his firm would be getting $2.4 million in income later that year for work on a “democratic development consulting project.”

To back up that claim, the government says, Gates gave the bank a fake invoice for $2.4 million, attesting that the payment was for “services rendered per the consultancy agreement pertaining to the parliamentary elections.”

But the bank wanted more proof that Manafort had sufficient income to be able to pay back a loan. When it wasn’t forthcoming, the bank rejected the application, according to the indictment.

Undeterred, Manafort and Gates applied to a different bank, using what prosecutors say were false and doctored financial documents to overstate their firm’s income by millions.

In October 2016, Manafort emailed Gates a PDF version of their firm’s actual profit and loss report, showing that they’d lost more than $600,000. Gates then allegedly converted the PDF into a Word document so it could be edited. He sent that back to Manafort, who then added more than $3.5 million in income to the document and returned it to Gates, who converted it back to a PDF that was sent to the bank.

Still, the bank had another problem with the application: Manafort owed American Express $300,000, and the debt had damaged his credit rating. So Manafort replied that he had actually lent his credit card to Gates, who had spent the money and failed to reimburse his partner. Manafort sent the bank a letter from Gates, who said that he had incurred the Amex charges and would pay his partner back.

The result, the government says: two loans worth $16 million.

  • Yep 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL, JB is getting excited over 5 year old tax fraud crimes by a guy who literally had ZERO contact with anyone in the Trump organization except Manafort, who is also only in trouble for tax fraud from 5+ years ago.

Let us know when any of these guys gets caught for Collusion to effect the election, JB.

We'll wait.

LMFAO!

  • Yep 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every day for a year...  we just keep hearing..  "any day now. We gonna get drumph ".

 

7 years into his presidency..   libs still gonna be holding onto hope.  

 

 

  • Yep 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pox said:

Every day for a year...  we just keep hearing..  "any day now. We gonna get drumph ".

 

7 years into his presidency..   libs still gonna be holding onto hope.  

 

 

FYI, Dipshit! Mueller's in NO hurry.

Timeline of the Watergate scandal

Timeline of the Watergate Scandal —Regarding the burglary and illegal wiretapping of the Washington, D.C. headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate complex by members of President of the United States Richard Nixon's re-election committee and subsequent abuse of powers by the president and administration officials to halt or hinder the investigation into the same.

  • November 5, 1968: Richard Nixon elected President.[1]
  • January 20, 1969: Richard Nixon is inaugurated as the 37th President of The United States.
  • July 1, 1971: David Young and Egil “Bud” Krogh write a memo suggesting the formation of what later became called the "White House Plumbers" in response to the leak of the Pentagon Papers by Daniel Ellsberg.
  • August 21, 1971: Nixon's Enemies List is started by White House aides (though Nixon himself may not have been aware of it); to "use the available federal machinery to screw our political enemies."
  • September 3, 1971: "White House Plumbers" E. Howard Hunt, G. Gordon Liddy, and others break into the offices of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist Lewis Fielding looking for material that might discredit Ellsberg, under the direction of John Ehrlichman or his staff within the White House. This was the Plumbers' first major operation.[2]
  • By early 1972, the Plumbers, at this stage assigned to the Committee to Re-Elect the President (CRP), had become frustrated at the lack of additional assignments they were being asked to perform, and that any plans and proposals they suggested were being rejected by CRP. Liddy and Hunt took their complaints to the White House – most likely to Charles Colson – and requested that the White House start putting pressure on CRP to assign them new operations. It is likely that both Colson and White House Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman did so, starting the train of events that led to the Watergate break-ins a few months later. This narrative was confirmed in the famous "Cancer on the Presidency" conversation between Nixon and White House Counsel John Dean on March 21, 1973.[3]
  • May 2, 1972: J. Edgar Hoover dies; L. Patrick Gray is appointed acting FBI director.[4]
  • June 17, 1972: The plumbers are arrested at 2:30 a.m. in the process of burglarizing and planting surveillance bugs in the Democratic National Committee offices at the Watergate Building Complex.
  • June 20, 1972: Reportedly based on a tip from Deep Throat (associate director of the FBI, Mark Felt), Bob Woodward reports in the Washington Post that one of the burglars had E. Howard Hunt in his address book and possessed checks signed by Hunt, and that Hunt was connected to Charles Colson.
  • June 23, 1972: In the Oval Office, H.R. Haldeman recommends to President Nixon that they attempt to shut down the FBI investigation of the Watergate break-in, by having CIA Director Richard Helms and Deputy Director Vernon A. Walters tell acting FBI Director L. Patrick Gray to, "Stay the hell out of this". Haldeman expects Gray will then seek and take advice from Deputy FBI Director Mark Felt, and Felt will obey direction from the White House out of ambition. Nixon agrees and gives the order. [5] The conversation is recorded.
  • September 15, 1972: Hunt, Liddy, and the Watergate burglars are indicted by a federal grand jury.
  • November 7, 1972: Nixon re-elected, defeating George McGovern with the largest plurality of votes in American history.
  • January 8, 1973: Five defendants plead guilty as the burglary trial begins. Liddy and James W. McCord Jr. are convicted after the trial.
  • January 20, 1973: Nixon is inaugurated for his second term.
  • February 28, 1973: Confirmation hearings begin for confirming L. Patrick Grayas permanent Director of the FBI. During these hearings, Gray reveals that he had complied with an order from John Dean to provide daily updates on the Watergate investigation, and also that Dean had "probably lied" to FBI investigators.
  • March 17, 1973: Watergate burglar McCord writes a letter to Judge John Sirica, claiming that some of his testimony was perjured under pressure and that the burglary was not a CIA operation, but had involved other government officials, thereby leading the investigation to the White House.
  • April 6, 1973: White House counsel John Dean begins cooperating with federal Watergate prosecutors.
  • April 27, 1973: L. Patrick Gray resigns after it comes to light that he destroyed files from E. Howard Hunt's safe. William Ruckelshaus is appointed as his replacement.
  • April 30, 1973: Senior White House administration officials Ehrlichman, Haldeman, and Richard Kleindienst resign, and John Dean is fired.
  • May 17, 1973: The Senate Watergate Committee begins its nationally televised hearings.
  • May 19, 1973: Independent special prosecutor Archibald Cox appointed to oversee investigation into possible presidential impropriety.
  • June 3, 1973: John Dean tells Watergate investigators that he has discussed the cover-up with Nixon at least 35 times.
  • July 13, 1973: Alexander Butterfield, former presidential appointments secretary, reveals that all conversations and telephone calls in Nixon’s office have been taped since 1971.
  • July 18, 1973: Nixon orders White House taping systems disconnected.
  • July 23, 1973: Nixon refuses to turn over presidential tapes to Senate Watergate Committee or the special prosecutor.
  • Vice President replaced:
  • October 20, 1973: "Saturday Night Massacre" - Nixon orders Elliot Richardsonand Ruckleshouse to fire special prosecutor Cox. They both refuse to comply and resign. Robert Bork considers resigning but carries out the order.
  • November 1, 1973: Leon Jaworski is appointed new special prosecutor.
  • November 17, 1973: Nixon delivers "I am not a crook" speech at a televised press conference at Disney World (Florida).
    • November 27, 1973: the Senate votes 92 to 3 to confirm Ford as Vice President.
    • December 6, 1973: the House votes 387 to 35 to confirm Ford as Vice President, and he takes the oath of office an hour after the vote.
  • January 28, 1974: Nixon campaign aide Herbert Porter pleads guilty to perjury.
  • February 25, 1974: Nixon personal counsel Herbert Kalmbach pleads guilty to two charges of illegal campaign activities.
  • March 1, 1974: In an indictment against seven former presidential aides, delivered to Judge Sirica together with a sealed briefcase intended for the House Committee on the Judiciary, Nixon is named as an unindicted co-conspirator.
  • March 4, 1974: the "Watergate Seven" (Mitchell, Haldeman, Ehrlichman, Colson, Gordon C. Strachan, Robert Mardian, and Kenneth Parkinson) are formally indicted.
  • March 18, 1974: Judge Sirica orders the grand jury's sealed report to be sent to the House Committee on the Judiciary.
  • April 5, 1974: Dwight Chapin convicted of lying to a grand jury.
  • April 7, 1974: Ed Reinecke, Republican lieutenant governor of California, indicted on three charges of perjury before the Senate committee.
  • April 16, 1974: Special Prosecutor Jaworski issues a subpoena for 64 White House tapes.
  • April 30, 1974: White House releases edited transcripts of the Nixon tapes, but the House Judiciary Committee insists the actual tapes must be turned over.
  • May 9, 1974: Impeachment hearings begin before the House Judiciary Committee.
  • June 15, 1974: Woodward and Bernstein's book All the President's Men is published by Simon & Schuster (ISBN 0-671-21781-X).
  • July 24, 1974: United States v. Nixon decided: Nixon is ordered to give up tapes to investigators.
  • Congress moves to impeach Nixon.
    • July 27 to July 30, 1974: House Judiciary Committee passes Articles of Impeachment.
    • Early August 1974: A previously unknown tape from June 23, 1972 (recorded a few days after the break-in) documenting Nixon and Haldeman formulating a plan to block investigations is released. This recording later became known as the "Smoking Gun".
    • Key Republican Senators tell Nixon that enough votes exist to convict him.
  • August 8, 1974: Nixon delivers his resignation speech in front of a nationally televised audience.
  • August 9, 1974: Nixon resigns from office. Gerald Ford becomes president.
  • September 8, 1974: President Ford ends the investigations by granting Nixon a pardon.
  • October 17, 1974: Ford testifies before Congress on the pardon, the first sitting president to testify before Congress since President Lincoln.
  • November 7, 1974: 94th Congress elected: Democratic Party picks up 5 Senate seats and 49 House seats. Many of the freshman congressmen are very young; the media dubs them "Watergate Babies".
  • December 31, 1974: As a result of Nixon administration abuses of privacy, Privacy Act of 1974 passes into law. Ford is persuaded to veto the bill by Richard Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld; Congress overrides Ford's veto. (Note that the newly elected Congress had not taken office yet, this Congress was still the 93rd Congress.)
  • January 1, 1975: John N. Mitchell, John Ehrlichman and H. R. Haldeman convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury.
  • July 27, 1975: Church Committee, chaired by Frank Church, commences to investigate foreign and domestic intelligence-gathering activities.
  • November 4, 1975: Ford replaces several Nixon cabinet members in the "Halloween Massacre", engineered by Ford aide Donald Rumsfeld. Richard Cheney, George H. W. Bush and Brent Scowcroft join Ford administration; Rumsfeld becomes Secretary of Defense; Henry Kissinger remains as Secretary of State but not National Security Advisor.
  • May 5, 1976: Church Committee superseded by Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.
  • November 2, 1976: Ford is defeated in the United States presidential election by Jimmy Carter.
  • January 20, 1977: Jimmy Carter is inaugurated at the 39th President of The United States.
  • May 4, 1977: Nixon gives his first major interview about Watergate with TV journalist David Frost.
  • May 15, 1978: Nixon publishes his memoirs, giving more of his side of the Watergate saga.
  • October 25, 1978: Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act enacted, creating Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and limiting federal government domestic surveillance powers. Recommended by Church Committee.
  • January, 1992: Publication of Silent Coup by journalists Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin, blaming Watergate burglary on John Dean who wanted to cover-up involvement of his fiancee with a call-girl ring. Book endorsed by Liddy in his first major statement about Watergate case, prompting Dean to sue Liddy, Colodny and Gettlin for defamation. Dean's case was dismissed and settled out of court; DNC secretary Ida "Maxine" Wells, also implicated by Liddy in call-girl coverup, sued for defamation but jury in that case deadlock and judge dismissed case in 2001.[6]
  • April 22, 1994: Richard Nixon dies aged 81, after suffering a stroke. In keeping with his own wishes, he was not given a state funeral, though his funeral service 5 days later was a high-profile affair, attended by all 5 living U.S. Presidents and a host of other VIPs.
  • May 31, 2005: W. Mark Felt, former Associate Director of the FBI during the Watergate years, declares that he is Deep Throat; this declaration was later confirmed by reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, although it was disputed by some writers.

References

  1.  Gerhard Peters. "The American Presidency Project Election of 1968". ucsb.edu. Archived from the original on 2016-09-28.
  2.  Owen Edwards; Smithsonian Magazine (October 2012). "The World's Most Famous Filing Cabinet: After Daniel Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon Papers, the infamous Plumbers broke into his psychiatrist's office, looking for a way to discredit him". smithsonianmag.com.
  3.  Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. "Transcript of a recording of a meeting among the President, John Dean, and H.R. Haldeman in the Oval Office, on March 21, 1973, from 10:12 to 11:55 AM" (PDF). nixonlibrary.gov. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 22, 2013.
  4.  Henry B. Hogue; Federation of American Scientists (March 17, 2005). "Nomination and Confirmation of the FBI Director: Process and Recent History" (PDF). fas.org. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 4, 2016.
  5.  "The Watergate Story | Nixon Resigns". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 2016-11-25. Retrieved 2016-12-30.
  6.  "Liddy Case Dismissed Jury Unable To Reach A Verdict After Deliberating 8 Hours". CBS News. February 1, 2001. Archived from the original on September 1, 2006.
  • Bernstein, C., & Woodward, B. (1974). All the President's Men. New York: Pocket Books.
  • Gay 2
  • JB 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, facelessman07 said:

tenor.gif?itemid=5056011

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And more of JB’s fascination with Trump....

2837F3C1-4351-48F2-8BFC-CB52A74CE5EF.jpeg

  • LMAO 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2018 at 1:02 PM, Beef said:

LOL, JB is getting excited over 5 year old tax fraud crimes by a guy who literally had ZERO contact with anyone in the Trump organization except Manafort, who is also only in trouble for tax fraud from 5+ years ago.

Let us know when any of these guys gets caught for Collusion to effect the election, JB.

We'll wait.

LMFAO!

It's called Money Laundering. Not only Money Laundering, but Money Laundering for a foreign government adversary. You and DumbFuck are stuck on semantics. I can assure you, Robert Mueller is not. But you and the other halfwits here continue with your folly.;)

  • JB 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, jb™ said:

It's called Money Laundering. Not only Money Laundering, but Money Laundering for a foreign government adversary. You and DumbFuck are stuck on semantics. I can assure you, Robert Mueller is not. But you and the other halfwits here continue with your folly.;)

 

6951C62E-17B0-4FF4-959D-2B535C61A78F.jpeg

  • Yep 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jb™ said:

It's called Money Laundering. Not only Money Laundering, but Money Laundering for a foreign government adversary. You and DumbFuck are stuck on semantics. I can assure you, Robert Mueller is not. But you and the other halfwits here continue with your folly.;)

Uh, wrong.  You stupid fucking liar.

There are 3 main charges against both, conspiracy to commit bank and tax fraud, and lying to investigators.  And all of them stemming from shit 5+ years ago that has ZERO to do with anything related to Trump.

They did legitimate lobbying/consulting work for all sorts of people and organizations all over the world, and then instead of properly paying taxes on all the income from this, they tucked much of it away in off-shore accounts in Cyprus and elsewhere.  Then, they took out large loans here in the US from banks to have liquidity (alleging they were for real estate investment properties, remodelings, and other business ventures) while they pulled cash from off-shore banks and paid the loans back.

This is simple tax evasion and banking fraud.

It's hilarious that you don't even read the fucking articles you post.  Such a moron.

  • Yep 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blade plead Guilty to the exact same charges   was he a Russian Agent ????

and did it cost tax payers 100 Million to investigate him ????

 

 

Fucking JB the Moron

 

 

1y83sz.jpg

  • Yep 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Beef said:

Uh, wrong.  You stupid fucking liar.

There are 3 main charges against both, conspiracy to commit bank and tax fraud, and lying to investigators.  And all of them stemming from shit 5+ years ago that has ZERO to do with anything related to Trump.

They did legitimate lobbying/consulting work for all sorts of people and organizations all over the world, and then instead of properly paying taxes on all the income from this, they tucked much of it away in off-shore accounts in Cyprus and elsewhere.  Then, they took out large loans here in the US from banks to have liquidity (alleging they were for real estate investment properties, remodelings, and other business ventures) while they pulled cash from off-shore banks and paid the loans back.

This is simple tax evasion and banking fraud.

It's hilarious that you don't even read the fucking articles you post.  Such a moron.

 

Yea, I mean according to this cretin Trump is some how responsible for every crime committed by any individual that has ever been in his orbit.....I suppose he is responsible for every criminal act ever committed in his life time as well......BY ANYBODY.....9_9

  • Yep 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shredman said:

Blade plead Guilty to the exact same charges   was he a Russian Agent ????

and did it cost tax payers 100 Million to investigate him ????

 

 

Fucking JB the Moron

 

 

1y83sz.jpg

This will fly over JB like a fighter jet at Mach 2 at 50,000 feet.

  • Yep 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Freebird Lives said:

Yea, I mean according to this cretin Trump is some how responsible for every crime committed by any individual that has ever been in his orbit.....I suppose he is responsible for every criminal act ever committed in his life time as well......BY ANYBODY.....9_9

What's fucked about all this is Mueller is way outside the scope of what the investigation was originally about.

1. Did Team Trump and any Russians conspire and collude to affect the outcome of the election?

2. Did Trump or any of his surrogates obstruct this investigation at any point?

 

First of all, simply speaking to Russians isn't illegal.

Second, there is no fucking way possible that they could ever EVER quantify that the election outcome was effected unless voting machines were tampered with, and we already know they were not.  When there's 1,001 reasons/narratives/memes/evidence presented to not vote or to vote for someone, and 100 of those things are fake/lies/propaganda, of which 50 of those were fabricated and propagated by Russians, it is IMPOSSIBLE to discern if the 901 legit ones influenced someone's actions or the 100 fake ones did.

So even if someone on Trump's campaign paid Russians for dirt on Hillary it isn't illegal.  Fuck, Hillary and the DNC did exactly just that and nobody on the Left gives two shits apparently.

The ONLY thing they could get someone on in this is if there is evidence someone on the Trump campaign paid the "proven hackers" (which they can't even prove) who stole Hillary's, Podesta's, and the DNC's emails and documents for those things, physically took possession of them, and then disseminated them to Wikileaks.  That would be buying and possessing stolen property, and maybe dissemination of classified materials.

But this still isn't conspiracy or collusion (which isn't even a crime), because again, they can't quantify the outcome of the election was effected.

 

I'm not concerned at all about Manafort, and especially not Gates.  Gates was a nobody in the campaign.  He was Manafort's righthand guy, that's it.  I'm not even sure if he ever even met Trump or anyone else in Trump's immediate circle.  From what I've read he didn't.

And Manafort had little to no relationship with Trump prior to Trump announcing in 2016.  They were acquaintances and Trump simply hired him on the recommendation from consultants and surrogates who said he has experience with campaigns.  And that was short lived.

Mueller overstepped the scope of his investigation parameters to find bank and tax fraud on Manafort and Gates.  He surely offered them deals if they had any dirt on Trump, but the fact he is slapping them with max offenses confirms they don't have shit on Team Trump.  Gates may get a lesser charge for blabbing on Manafort, but that's it.

  • Yep 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Beef said:

Uh, wrong.  You stupid fucking liar.

There are 3 main charges against both, conspiracy to commit bank and tax fraud, and lying to investigators.  And all of them stemming from shit 5+ years ago that has ZERO to do with anything related to Trump.

They did legitimate lobbying/consulting work for all sorts of people and organizations all over the world, and then instead of properly paying taxes on all the income from this, they tucked much of it away in off-shore accounts in Cyprus and elsewhere.  Then, they took out large loans here in the US from banks to have liquidity (alleging they were for real estate investment properties, remodelings, and other business ventures) while they pulled cash from off-shore banks and paid the loans back.

This is simple tax evasion and banking fraud.

It's hilarious that you don't even read the fucking articles you post.  Such a moron.

Only a moron would believe who Mueller's indicted and what he and his Grand Jury are done. Perhaps NONE of it will be charges of Collusiondown the road, but there's sooooooooooo much more he's looking at. I realize all your mind can wrap itself around is what you're reading at the moment. But if ya wanna really get an idea of what's coming, take a long look at what happened in Watergate, and this will be far deeper than watergate with DumbFuck and his minions of Lies more than likely being led outta the White House in handcuffs. What're ya gonna say then? OOPS?xD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, jb™ said:

Only a moron would believe who Mueller's indicted and what he and his Grand Jury are done. Perhaps NONE of it will be charges of Collusiondown the road, but there's sooooooooooo much more he's looking at. I realize all your mind can wrap itself around is what you're reading at the moment. But if ya wanna really get an idea of what's coming, take a long look at what happened in Watergate, and this will be far deeper than watergate with DumbFuck and his minions of Lies more than likely being led outta the White House in handcuffs. What're ya gonna say then? OOPS?xD 

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

What a turd burglar you are.

  • Yep 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, jb™ said:

Only a moron would believe who Mueller's indicted and what he and his Grand Jury are done.

Are you illiterate?  Just read that sentence and explain why it's so fucking incoherent.

29 minutes ago, jb™ said:

Perhaps NONE of it will be charges of Collusiondown the road, but there's sooooooooooo much more he's looking at.

How in the hell would you know what Mueller is looking at?

He's leaked everything he could to try and justify the SC's existence, and then tossed out 4 unrelated indictments that have ZERO to do with Trump or his campaign.  Why haven't we heard anything that actually justifies the reason for the SC?

Like name for us an actual valid reason for Mueller's existence at this point.  Official probable cause.

You understand the purpose of an investigation is the find a perpetrator of a crime, not find a crime for someone you don't like, correct?

So what's the crime?  What's the probable cause?

29 minutes ago, jb™ said:

I realize all your mind can wrap itself around is what you're reading at the moment. But if ya wanna really get an idea of what's coming, take a long look at what happened in Watergate, and this will be far deeper than watergate with DumbFuck and his minions of Lies more than likely being led outta the White House in handcuffs. What're ya gonna say then? OOPS?

Watergate had an actual crime beforehand and a whistleblower who supplied evidence.

This has neither.

 

I mean you have 100% proof that Hillary and the DNC paid a Brit who then paid Russians for unverified/unverifiable bullshit on Trump, then released this document to press to try and influence the election, and you don't seem to care one bit.

The exact thing you're crying that Trump did, your side has proof of doing, and you don't care.

 

So which is it, JB?  Is it illegal to collude with Russians to try and affect the election or not?

What else are you upset with Trump about that he supposedly did that we don't have irrefutable proof of your side actually doing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Beef said:

Are you illiterate?  Just read that sentence and explain why it's so fucking incoherent.

How in the hell would you know what Mueller is looking at?

He's leaked everything he could to try and justify the SC's existence, and then tossed out 4 unrelated indictments that have ZERO to do with Trump or his campaign.  Why haven't we heard anything that actually justifies the reason for the SC?

Like name for us an actual valid reason for Mueller's existence at this point.  Official probable cause.

You understand the purpose of an investigation is the find a perpetrator of a crime, not find a crime for someone you don't like, correct?

So what's the crime?  What's the probable cause?

Watergate had an actual crime beforehand and a whistleblower who supplied evidence.

This has neither.

 

I mean you have 100% proof that Hillary and the DNC paid a Brit who then paid Russians for unverified/unverifiable bullshit on Trump, then released this document to press to try and influence the election, and you don't seem to care one bit.

The exact thing you're crying that Trump did, your side has proof of doing, and you don't care.

 

So which is it, JB?  Is it illegal to collude with Russians to try and affect the election or not?

What else are you upset with Trump about that he supposedly did that we don't have irrefutable proof of your side actually doing?

Not my call. I'll leave it up to the Special Council.

But Alex, I'll take Multiple Charges for $900.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jb™ said:

Not my call. I'll leave it up to the Special Council.

But Alex, I'll take Multiple Charges for $900.

So you got nothing, as usual.

You realize how stupid you always show yourself to be?  Nothing but driveby quips, attacks, and completely baseless unsupported accusations.  And then when anyone even tries to engage you in an actual debate, you NEVER actually do it and bring anything of substance.

This isn't normal, man.  You're nothing but a clown here.

Like I said before, a monkey on an organ grinder that's so pathetic it's entertaining.

  • Yep 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jb™ said:

Only a moron would believe who Mueller's indicted and what he and his Grand Jury are done. Perhaps NONE of it will be charges of Collusiondown the road, but there's sooooooooooo much more he's looking at. I realize all your mind can wrap itself around is what you're reading at the moment. But if ya wanna really get an idea of what's coming, take a long look at what happened in Watergate, and this will be far deeper than watergate with DumbFuck and his minions of Lies more than likely being led outta the White House in handcuffs. What're ya gonna say then? OOPS?xD 

LMMFAO.....shit for brains, is that not EXACTLY WTF you been crowing here for months in between your RACIST !  RACIST ! screeds ? ......xD

  • Yep 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×