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IT'S MUELLER TIME!!!

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NEW TODAY 2/27

 

Mueller moves to drop more than 20 criminal counts against former Trump campaign official Rick Gates

Special counsel Robert Mueller moved Monday to dismiss more than 20 charges against former Trump campaign official Rick Gates, multiple outlets reported, after Gates pleaded guilty last week to conspiracy and lying.

The charges being dropped were brought against Gates in a court in Alexandria, Virginia, in keeping with the terms of his plea deal. 

"The Office will move promptly to dismiss the remaining counts of the Indictment in this matter," the agreement says. "In addition, the Office will move promptly to dismiss without prejudice the charges brought against your client in the Eastern District of Virginia."

 

 

Rick Gates, former deputy campaign manager for Donald Trump, exits Federal Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018.

If Gates breaks the terms of the agreement, he can be re-charged with the same crimes without having the option to fight his case in Virginia. 

Gates, 45, is being relieved of more than 20 criminal counts, all of which were announced Thursday in a second criminal indictment against him and former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort. Gates was a close business associate of Manafort, who is a longtime lobbyist for Ukrainian political parties supportive of pro-Russian former President Viktor Yanukovych. The former Ukrainian president is living in exile in Russia and wanted for high treason by his country.

The superseding indictment charged Gates and Manafort with bank fraud and bank fraud conspiracy. The two defendants had previously been charged in October 2017 in a 12-count indictment including money laundering, lying to federal investigators and failing to register as foreign agents. 

On Friday, Gates pleaded guilty to two additional charges on the same day they were issued: conspiracy against the U.S. and lying to federal investigators. He still faces a prison sentence of nearly six years, but the special counsel has the ability to request a shorter sentence for him. 

That tool could be crucial for Mueller's team, who could use the leverage of a lighter prison sentence to yield more valuable information from Gates about the ongoing Russia probe. 

Gates was deeply involved in the inner workings of the campaign, and remained a part of Trump's election bid even after Manafort resigned in August 2016. Gates also worked as a liaison between the campaign and the Republican National Committee, and was involved in the presidential transition after the election. 

Manafort, on the other hand, has maintained his innocence even as he continues to rack up charges.

"I had hoped and expected my business colleague would have had the strength to continue the battle to prove our innocence. For reasons yet to surface he chose to do otherwise," Manafort said following Gates' change of plea.

The former campaign chairman, 68, was hit with five additional criminal counts on Friday, including lying, conspiracy to launder money and acting as an unregistered foreign agent.

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Gates throwing Manafort under the bus. 

Big fucking deal.

Poor JB. He’s still holding out hope that Hillary will be made President.  LMFAO

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Somebody give jb the suicide hotline number. 

He's gonna need it when Mueller's investigation is over. 

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NEW TODAY 2/28

 

Mueller Asking About Trump’s Russia Business Deals and Miss Universe Pageant

By  

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigators have been asking witnesses about what Russia could possibly have on President Donald Trump, reports claim.

Two sources familiar with the interviews told CNN late Tuesday that Mueller’s team have been asking questions about why Trump’s efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow fell apart and what damaging information Russians could have on him.

Investigators are also asking about the timing of Trump’s decision to run in the 2016 election and how that might have intersected with his business ventures.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

 

02_02_18_IndictmentMuellerRobert Mueller testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing on Capitol Hill on December 14, 2011, in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images 

Mueller is investigating the Kremlin’s interference in the 2016 election and on February 16 issued an indictment against 13 Russians for their role in a misinformation campaign against the U.S. The indictment noted the Russian campaign began in 2014.

Several former Trump campaign staff and administration officials have pleaded guilty to charges from the special counsel and are cooperating with the investigation.

On February 17 Trump tweeted the Russian misinformation group was formed “long before my run for President. Maybe they knew I was going to run even though I didn’t know!”

 

But according to one of the sources, a witness has told Mueller’s investigators they believe Trump became serious about running in 2014.

One of the sources likened the questions to checking a box since “the allegations are out there.”

“You ask everything even if you don't think it's credible,” they said.

Read more: Americans trust Robert Mueller more than Donald Trump on Russia collusion claims: Poll

Trump first began discussing the idea of a Trump Tower Moscow with Russian property magnate Aras Agalarov and his son Emin Agalarov soon after they partnered with him to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow in 2013.

It was through Emin’s music publicist Rob Goldstone that Donald Trump Jr. received emails in June 2016 promising dirt on Hillary Clinton through the Agalarov’s connections to the Russian government.

One of the sources said that Mueller’s team have focussed on what happened during the pageant, such as which government officials and business leaders Trump met with, as well as the logistics around his hotel room.

In early 2017 BuzzFeed News published the Steele dossier, which alleges that Russia could have “kompromat”—compromising material—on Trump in the form of a video of prostitutes hired during the 2013 trip to defile a bed slept in by the Obamas in Trump’s room at the Moscow Ritz-Carlton.

Investigators, the source said, wanted to know who was there, who had access to the room, and who was in charge of security.

Trump has said he is willing to sit down and answer questions from the special counsel in a face-to-face interview. His lawyers are resisting the idea of a wide-ranging interview The Wall Street Journal reported last weekend.

Trump’s lawyers said they will only agree to the interview if the questions are “limited in scope” and don’t test Trump’s “recollections in ways that amount to a potential perjury trap.”

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1 hour ago, jb™ said:

Two sources familiar with the interviews told CNN

LMFAO!!!

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1 hour ago, jb™ said:

One of the sources likened the questions to checking a box since “the allegations are out there.”

“You ask everything even if you don't think it's credible,” they said.

LOL, Team Mueller doesn’t even believe there’s anything.  They are just “checking the boxes off on allegations”.

Poor JB. So much hope. So little brains. 

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1 hour ago, jb™ said:

In early 2017 BuzzFeed News published the Steele dossier, which alleges that Russia could have “kompromat”—compromising material—on Trump in the form of a video of prostitutes hired during the 2013 trip to defile a bed slept in by the Obamas in Trump’s room at the Moscow Ritz-Carlton.

Investigators, the source said, wanted to know who was there, who had access to the room, and who was in charge of security.

They are actually investigating the “Golden Showers” accusation from the Dossier!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

What a colossal waste of our ya dollars.

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I'm actually becoming bored whipping JB on the daily.

The dude is so far gone there's no hope for a turnaround.

But I'm sure I'll continue flogging his dumbass just because.....

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5 hours ago, Beef said:

They are actually investigating the “Golden Showers” accusation from the Dossier!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

What a colossal waste of our ya dollars.

I can't understand why Robert Mueller doesn't believe you and Donnie....xD746.gif

Robert Mueller Is Going Way Beyond Trump’s Red Line

The special counsel is digging deeper into Trump’s business ties to Russia—including how his financial interests might intersect with the origins of his presidential campaign.

Abigail Tracy

Last summer, Donald Trump cautioned that Robert Mueller would be crossing a red line if he began digging into his family’s finances. “I think that’s a violation. Look, this is about Russia,” Trump said at the time. Mueller, however, seems to believe that questions surrounding Trump’s business deals and Russian ties are intertwined. The day after Trump issued his ultimatum, reports emerged that the special counsel was, in fact, probing his overseas business transactions. But the president backed down, allowing Mueller to continue his investigation. And Mueller, unbowed, has kept digging.

Seven months later, CNN reports that Mueller has expanded his inquiry to include Russia’s potential leverage over the president and why he decided to run for president. According to sources who spoke to CNN, F.B.I. investigators have questioned witnesses about whether Trump showed an interest in running for president as far back as 2014, and how that desire coincided with his business ventures in Russia. The new line of inquiry confirms that Mueller is not just investigating potential obstruction of justice, but also allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

It is unclear whether Mueller is pursuing any hardened leads. “You ask everything even if you don’t think it’s credible,” one of the sources told CNN. “The allegations are out there, and it was checking the box.” Still, there are reasons to believe that the origins of Trump’s campaign might intersect with his financial interests in Russia. In late 2015, for example, Russian-born developer Felix Sater e-mailed Trump lawyer Michael Cohen to boast that they would soon be celebrating both Trump’s election and a major new real-estate deal in Moscow. “I will get Putin on this program and we will get Donald elected,” he wrote Cohen, suggesting the two goals were connected. “I know how to play it and we will get this done. Buddy our boy can become president of the USA and we can engineer it. I will get all of Putin’s team to buy in on this.”

Trump’s business interests in Russia predate 2015, of course. In 2008, the president’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., bragged that “Russians make up a pretty disproportionate cross-section of a lot of our assets. We see a lot of money pouring in from Russia.” In 2013, Trump partnered with Russian real-estate developer Aras Agalarov and his son, Emin Agalarov, to bring the Miss Universe pageant to Moscow. Three years later, Emin Agalrov would help arrange the infamous Trump Tower meeting between Don Jr. and a Russian lawyer peddling dirt on Clinton.

Mueller is particularly interested in the pageant, according to CNN. One source said the special counsel was focused on uncovering the financing for the 2013 event, which the Trump Organization has never disclosed. Investigators reportedly pursued lines of questioning that led another source to believe they were looking into whether Trump could have been compromised during the pageant, and if the Russians possibly had “kompromat” on Trump, as detailed in the Steele dossier. Sater’s failed attempt to build a Trump Tower in Moscow has also raised red flags. Shortly after the 2013 pageant, Trump tweeted at Aras Agalarov, “TRUMP TOWER-MOSCOW is next.” The deal fell through after the United States imposed sanctions on Russia for invading Ukraine, but Cohen restarted negotiations in 2015, and Trump signed a letter of intent to proceed. (Cohen has said he ended the negotiations in early 2016.)

The revelation that Mueller is probing Trump’s business dealings in Russia comes on the heels of Rick Gates’s guilty plea on two relatively minor charges, in exchange for his cooperation. Gates is the third former Trump campaign aide to flip, joining the ranks of former national security adviser Mike Flynn and former foreign policy aide George Papadopoulos. All three could offer illuminating accounts of the Trump campaign’s inner workings, and Flynn and Gates, who stayed on after the campaign, were witness to key moments in the Trump White House.

The special prosecutor’s reported avenue of questioning suggests he is taking advantage of his far-reaching mandate—something congressional lawmakers have so far been hesitant to do. Six Republicans told CNN earlier this week that they will not dig into Trump’s financial past or the dealings of the Trump Organization, despite calls from Democrats to do so. “Isn’t that what Bob Mueller is doing?” Congressman Trey Gowdy, who serves as the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, asked rhetorically on CNN. But while lawmakers have the ill will of the White House to contend with—as The Washington Post reported Wednesday, Team Trump is keeping track of which Republicans have proven their loyalty to the president and which have not ahead of the 2018 midterms—Mueller is beholden to no one, and his recent slew of charges have effectively neutralized Trump’s threats to fire him before the investigation is complete. “What matters is how much leverage you have on either side,” former Chicago prosecutor Renato Mariotti told me. Where Trump is concerned, “Mueller has most of the leverage . . . in the end, Mueller is going to get most, if not the vast majority, of what he wants.”

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5 hours ago, Beef said:

c6f5fb_2cdcff9a7bff45859c40828dbb22e160~

 

5 hours ago, SaintRay said:

c6f5fb_2cdcff9a7bff45859c40828dbb22e160~

603.gif

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7 minutes ago, jb™ said:

In late 2015, for example, Russian-born developer Felix Sater e-mailed Trump lawyer Michael Cohen to boast that they would soon be celebrating both Trump’s election and a major new real-estate deal in Moscow. “I will get Putin on this program and we will get Donald elected,” he wrote Cohen, suggesting the two goals were connected. “I know how to play it and we will get this done. Buddy our boy can become president of the USA and we can engineer it. I will get all of Putin’s team to buy in on this.”

LOL, so Vanity Fair and NYT is quoting more "unnamed sources familiar with matters"??

LMFAO, you poor old man.

Trump is a billionaire real estate developer.  He was working on a hotel deal in Moscow.  And it fell through.

Gee, I wonder why it fell through if he was so much in bed with Putin and all these Russians?

ROFL

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why is jb so concerned about russians and trump, when his party directly colluded with them? created a fake dossier to commit more crimes against american people.

there is more dirt on the democrats colluding with russia than there is trump colluding with russians. 

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xDxD

Robert Mueller Has Trump and Family in His Crosshairs

 
28-trump-kushner.w710.h473.jpg
President Donald Trump talks with Jared Kushner as they attend a Hanukkah reception in the White House on December 7, 2017. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Over the last day, three new reports have come out about Robert Mueller’s investigation. Yesterday evening, CNN reported that Jared Kushner has not been able to obtain a security clearance due to the Russia investigation. (This confirmed what had been strongly implied by a Washington Post report from last week, that “significant information requiring additional investigation” was holding up Kushner. CNN confirms that the new information is related to Mueller’s probe.) This morning, CNN reported Mueller is asking witnesses about Trump’s business in Russia before his presidential run, including compromising information Russia may have had on Trump. And this afternoon, NBC reports Mueller is asking associates of Trump whether he knew about Russian hacking of Democratic emails.

It is always hard to discern exactly what any of these glimpses into the investigation reveal. As has been the case throughout, every leak appears to come from the defense side. Mueller’s team seems completely leakproof, and his indictments have often come as a surprise to everybody else.

More importantly, the fact Mueller is asking a question does not mean he will get an incriminating answer. Questioning witnesses about a potential crime is not the same as seeking an indictment (and an indictment, of course, is not a conviction).

So what can we take away? One safe conclusion is that the investigation is probably not near done. Another is that Trump and his family are not safe. Mueller has only so far charged people outside Trump’s family — his campaign manager, national security adviser, and 13 Russian internet trolls — which the president and his defenders have weirdly treated as a kind of vindication.

The big picture is that, after Trump burned enough creditors that American banks stopped dealing with him, he became deeply reliant on Russian capital. The Russian economy is deeply connected to Vladimir Putin, and uses its leverage to advance political goals. For instance, Vnesheconombank, which works closely with Putin, financed a Trump hotel in Toronto. Trump’s finances are totally opaque, and he has been willing to endure a great deal of critical media coverage — the thing he most hates in the world — in order to avoid publishing his tax returns.

Kushner is also an important figure. He has his own web of business ties with Russia, and had assumed a lead role in communicating with the Russians secretly. Remember the secret backchannel he conducted with Russia during the transition, designed to elude American intelligence? If a new development arose in recent weeks, that probably bodes poorly for the president’s son-in-law.

Meanwhile, as Steve Bannon sloppily confessed, after Donald Trump Jr. had a meeting with a Russian promising dirt on Hillary Clinton in June 2016, it is overwhelmingly likely that he proceeded immediately to tell the father whose approval is the thing he most craves. That may or may not be provable by Mueller. But he is certainly going to try.

Update: The resignation of White House Communications Director Hope Hicks, the day after her House testimony on the Russia investigation, may or may not have any relation to what Hicks knows about Russia. But Hicks has a quasi-familial role, as one of the few genuine Trump loyalists (whose bond with the president is personal, not professional or ideological). Who knows if she knows anything pertinent, or plans to share it with the FBI?

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2 minutes ago, jb™ said:

xDxD

Robert Mueller Has Trump and Family in His Crosshairs

 
28-trump-kushner.w710.h473.jpg
President Donald Trump talks with Jared Kushner as they attend a Hanukkah reception in the White House on December 7, 2017. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Over the last day, three new reports have come out about Robert Mueller’s investigation. Yesterday evening, CNN reported that Jared Kushner has not been able to obtain a security clearance due to the Russia investigation. (This confirmed what had been strongly implied by a Washington Post report from last week, that “significant information requiring additional investigation” was holding up Kushner. CNN confirms that the new information is related to Mueller’s probe.) This morning, CNN reported Mueller is asking witnesses about Trump’s business in Russia before his presidential run, including compromising information Russia may have had on Trump. And this afternoon, NBC reports Mueller is asking associates of Trump whether he knew about Russian hacking of Democratic emails.

It is always hard to discern exactly what any of these glimpses into the investigation reveal. As has been the case throughout, every leak appears to come from the defense side. Mueller’s team seems completely leakproof, and his indictments have often come as a surprise to everybody else.

More importantly, the fact Mueller is asking a question does not mean he will get an incriminating answer. Questioning witnesses about a potential crime is not the same as seeking an indictment (and an indictment, of course, is not a conviction).

So what can we take away? One safe conclusion is that the investigation is probably not near done. Another is that Trump and his family are not safe. Mueller has only so far charged people outside Trump’s family — his campaign manager, national security adviser, and 13 Russian internet trolls — which the president and his defenders have weirdly treated as a kind of vindication.

The big picture is that, after Trump burned enough creditors that American banks stopped dealing with him, he became deeply reliant on Russian capital. The Russian economy is deeply connected to Vladimir Putin, and uses its leverage to advance political goals. For instance, Vnesheconombank, which works closely with Putin, financed a Trump hotel in Toronto. Trump’s finances are totally opaque, and he has been willing to endure a great deal of critical media coverage — the thing he most hates in the world — in order to avoid publishing his tax returns.

Kushner is also an important figure. He has his own web of business ties with Russia, and had assumed a lead role in communicating with the Russians secretly. Remember the secret backchannel he conducted with Russia during the transition, designed to elude American intelligence? If a new development arose in recent weeks, that probably bodes poorly for the president’s son-in-law.

Meanwhile, as Steve Bannon sloppily confessed, after Donald Trump Jr. had a meeting with a Russian promising dirt on Hillary Clinton in June 2016, it is overwhelmingly likely that he proceeded immediately to tell the father whose approval is the thing he most craves. That may or may not be provable by Mueller. But he is certainly going to try.

Update: The resignation of White House Communications Director Hope Hicks, the day after her House testimony on the Russia investigation, may or may not have any relation to what Hicks knows about Russia. But Hicks has a quasi-familial role, as one of the few genuine Trump loyalists (whose bond with the president is personal, not professional or ideological). Who knows if she knows anything pertinent, or plans to share it with the FBI?

image.png

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JB basically spamming us daily now with TDS News.

Thats all this shit is.  Some butthurt faggot throwing shade at Trump, trying to get the Lefty sheeple in an orgasmic frenzy with hate-boners blowing loads all over the internet. LOL

2020 is going to be a cakewalk for Trump at this rate.

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Just now, Beef said:

JB basically spamming us daily now with TDS News.

Thats all this shit is.  Some butthurt faggot throwing shade at Trump, trying to get the Lefty sheeple in an orgasmic frenzy.

2020 is going to be a cakewalk for Trump at this rate.

Sums him up in a nut shell .....as this BS subsides more and more in the coming weeks I expect him to get wayyyyy more desperate.......dumb fucker is hoping/praying for a new Liddy as we speak....

 

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JB is orgasmic at this point.

Load is missing the mark.

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My gawd, 2020 can't get here fast enough. JB's meltdown after Trump's re-election will probably be the single greatest thing ever on the internet.

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For the first time, Mueller looks to be moving 'up the food chain' to ensnare Trump in the Russian collusion probe

3h 

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Sign up for the latest Russia investigation updates here.

robert mueller
Robert Mueller.
Thomson Reuters
  • The Russia investigation took a significant step forward when reports surfaced Wednesday that the special counsel Robert Mueller was questioning witnesses about what President Donald Trump knew about Russia's hack of the Democratic National Committee.
  • While Trump is a focus of the obstruction-of-justice thread of the investigation, he has not been a subject of the collusion inquiry — until now.
  • "Prosecutors typically move up the food chain" in these types of investigations, said one legal expert who was formerly an intelligence official.
  • Mueller's latest focus suggests that he has enough evidence in the collusion thread "to begin putting a story together that involves Trump," the legal expert said.

On Wednesday, the special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into whether President Donald Trump's campaign colluded with Moscow to influence the outcome of the 2016 US election apparently set its sights, for the first time, on 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. 

A new report from NBC News said Mueller was scrutinizing what Trump knew about the Russian-backed campaign to hack into the Democratic National Committee in the summer of 2016, and whether Trump had any role in the radical pro-transparency group WikiLeaks' subsequent dissemination of the stolen emails. 

Mueller is overseeing the FBI's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 US election. The probe, broadly, has two main threads related to Trump: whether members of his campaign colluded with Moscow to tilt the race in his favor, and whether he sought to obstruct justice when he fired James Comey as the FBI director last May. 

Trump is the focus — indeed, the catalyst — of the obstruction inquiry. But Wednesday's report is the first to indicate prosecutors are eyeing the president as they investigate whether there was collusion with a hostile foreign power. 

Since Comey publicly confirmed the existence of the Russia investigation, Trump has repeatedly asserted that neither he nor his campaign colluded with Russia. 

"It is now commonly agreed, after many months of COSTLY looking, that there was NO collusion between Russia and Trump," Trump tweeted in October. 

Trump did so again last month after the House Intelligence Committee released a controversial Republican memo purporting to show surveillance abuses by the FBI and the Department of Justice in seeking to monitor an adviser to the Trump campaign. 

"This memo totally vindicates 'Trump' in probe," the president said. "But the Russian Witch Hunt goes on and on. Their was no Collusion and there was no Obstruction (the word now used because, after one year of looking endlessly and finding NOTHING, collusion is dead). This is an American disgrace!" 

But Mueller's actions over the past few weeks appear to be sending another signal entirely. 

Moving 'up the food chain' 

President Donald Trump.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Last month, the special counsel's office charged 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities with conspiring to interfere in the 2016 race by mounting an elaborate social-media disinformation campaign aimed at sowing discord before and after the election. 

The indictment laid out a stark picture of how the Russians carried out the scheme, which the court filing said they undertook with the specific purpose of boosting Trump and denigrating his opponent. 

The document did not name any Americans as willing co-conspirators, and it did not make a judgment on whether the defendants' actions affected the outcome of the election — something the president trumpeted. 

"Russia started their anti-US campaign in 2014, long before I announced that I would run for President," Trump tweeted on February 16, the day after the indictment was unsealed. "The results of the election were not impacted. The Trump campaign did nothing wrong — no collusion!" 

But legal experts warned at the time that the indictment could be just the first step in a broader examination of whether any Americans aided the Russians' efforts and, if so, to what extent. 

Collusion, as Trump and his allies have repeatedly pointed out, is not in and of itself a crime. Mueller's approach to the inquiry is likely to be tethered to proving two key assertions: that a conspiracy to defraud the US took place by way of attempting to interfere in the election, and that Americans had knowledge of and acted to further that conspiracy. 

Wednesday's report appears to be a public confirmation of Mueller's attention to the latter. 

Investigators are said to be interested in Trump's public appeal in a press conference on July 27, 2016, for Russia to recover deleted emails of Hillary Clinton, then the Democratic presidential nominee. 

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," Trump said at the time. 

Mueller's new focus on Trump as it relates to Russia's DNC hack and WikiLeaks' actions "is a significant development," said Jens David Ohlin, a vice dean at Cornell Law School who's an expert on criminal law. 

"In these kinds of investigations, prosecutors typically move up the food chain," said Robert Deitz, a former general counsel at the National Security Agency. "I suspect that Mueller, through earlier interviews or documents, finally has sufficient evidence to begin putting a story together that involves Trump." 

The special counsel's scrutiny comes as Trump's lawyers are angling to sidestep a face-to-face interview between Mueller and their client, who has shown a tendency to exaggerate the truth. 

"The one specious thing about Trump's lawyers' strategy is that they're saying there's no substantive focus on Trump when it comes to the collusion inquiry, that this is all about obstruction of justice, and that Mueller already has everything he needs from other witnesses and documents for the obstruction case," said Andrew Wright, who served in the White House counsel's office under President Barack Obama. 

"Setting the obstruction case aside, what has happened over the last couple of weeks is that Mueller laid the foundation" for the collusion inquiry, Wright said, "by showing the crimes of the Russians, in at least some form." 

"And now we're seeing his focus on Trump about the hacked emails," he continued. "At this point, it's a matter of proving whether Americans were participants in this conspiracy to commit these crimes and whether they aided or abetted these acts." 

Filling in the dots 

Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks.
Carl Court/Getty Images

Trump is not known to have communicated with WikiLeaks, an organization the US intelligence community believes to be a tool of the Russian government. 

But as a presidential candidate, Trump expressed support for the group, repeatedly praising it ahead of the election in November. 

"It's amazing how nothing is secret today when you talk about the internet," he said at a rally on October 6, 2016, adding that he loved WikiLeaks. 

He also tweeted about WikiLeaks five days later: "I hope people are looking at the disgraceful behavior of Hillary Clinton as exposed by WikiLeaks. She is unfit to run." 

WikiLeaks told Donald Trump Jr., Trump's eldest son, in a Twitter direct message on October 12, 2016, that it was "great" to see him and Trump "talking about our publications." It "strongly" suggested Trump tweet the link wlsearch.tk, saying the site would help people search through the hacked documents. 

WikiLeaks also told Trump Jr. it had just released another batch of emails belonging to Clinton's campaign manager, John Podesta. 

An hour later, Trump tweeted: "Very little pick-up by the dishonest media of incredible information provided by WikiLeaks. So dishonest! Rigged system!" 

Jeffrey Cramer, a longtime former federal prosecutor who is now the managing director at Berkeley Research Group, emphasized that while Trump's statements on the campaign trail were important to Mueller's case, they were not illegal. 

"It could be one data point as the investigators delve into whether there was any connection between Trump or his campaign and WikiLeaks or the Russians," Cramer said. "Relevant facts to make a case would include whether anyone connected with the campaign assisted the release in any way." 

Donald Trump Jr. and his father.
Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images

Trump Jr. was in touch with WikiLeaks on multiple occasions between September 2016 and July 2017. Reports have indicated that the bulk of Trump Jr.'s interactionswith the group on Twitter took place in October 2016. 

In addition to scrutinizing Trump, Mueller's team is also reportedly looking into the Republican strategist Roger Stone's contacts with WikiLeaks, its founder, and the Russia-linked hacker Guccifer 2.0, whom US intelligence agencies have characterized as a front for Russian military intelligence. 

Stone was an informal adviser to the Trump campaign until August 2015. He was in direct contact with WikiLeaks in mid-October 2016, during which they had a brief back-and-forth, according to The Atlantic. 

The morning after Trump won the 2016 election, WikiLeaks reportedly messaged Stone: "Happy? We are now more free to communicate." 

Stone's relationship with Trump has also sparked prosecutors' interest. 

One witness interviewed by Mueller's team told NBC News that investigators asked about what Stone's interactions with Trump were like once he ended his tenure as a Trump campaign adviser in August 2015. 

"How often did they talk? Who really fired him? Was he really fired?" the witness told NBC News, describing the questions they were asked. 

Deitz said Mueller would "continue to fill in the dots until he has enough to seek an interview with (or indictment of) Trump."

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*snore*

What a dramatization.

What’s laughable is there still isn’t really even any proof that “Russians” hacked the DNC and Podesta Gmail account. 

To this day, nobody but Crowdstrike has ever examined the DNC server, and Podesta’s Gmail account wasn’t even a “hack”, it was a low budget phishing scam. 

All any lawyer has to do is ask Mueller to prove Russians hacked the DNC server, and when all they produce is a 3rd party report from Crowdstike who was paid by the DNC to produce that report, it will get declared inadmissible due to potential partiality and bias. 

Especially considering the DNC helped pay for a fabricated Dossier supplied them by Russians. 

They are drowning in conflicts of interest and impropriety.

 

Also, the FBI, NSA, DHS, and CIA chiefs already all testified in front Congress that they investigated these allegations and found no connection between Team Trump and any Russians allegedly involved in the DNC hacking.

So Mueller is literally wasting money on bullshit that has already been investigated and cleared by damn near every investigatory agency we have. 

 

Prepare for your hopes to be crushed again, JB. LOL

 

I'm still open for that ban bet. 

Trump gets removed from office I will delete my account.  If he doesn’t by the time this investigation ends, you delete yours. 

How about it?  You still going to puss out?

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28 minutes ago, Beef said:

*snore*

What a dramatization.

What’s laughable is there still isn’t really even any proof that “Russians” hacked the DNC and Podesta Gmail account. 

To this day, nobody but Crowdstrike has ever examined the DNC server, and Podesta’s Gmail account wasn’t even a “hack”, it was a low budget phishing scam. 

All any lawyer has to do is ask Mueller to prove Russians hacked the DNC server, and when all they produce is a 3rd party report from Crowdstike who was paid by the DNC to produce that report, it will get declared inadmissible due to potential partiality and bias. 

Especially considering the DNC helped pay for a fabricated Dossier supplied them by Russians. 

They are drowning in conflicts of interest and impropriety.

 

Also, the FBI, NSA, DHS, and CIA chiefs already all testified in front Congress that they investigated these allegations and found no connection between Team Trump and any Russians allegedly involved in the DNC hacking.

So Mueller is literally wasting money on bullshit that has already been investigated and cleared by damn near every investigatory agency we have. 

 

Prepare for your hopes to be crushed again, JB. LOL

 

I'm still open for that ban bet. 

Trump gets removed from office I will delete my account.  If he doesn’t by the time this investigation ends, you delete yours. 

How about it?  You still going to puss out?

Lol at the thought of JB putting his money where his mouth is. 

  • Yep 1

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2 hours ago, Beef said:

Prepare for your hopes to be crushed again, JB. LOL

 

I'm still open for that ban bet. 

Trump gets removed from office I will delete my account.  If he doesn’t by the time this investigation ends, you delete yours. 

How about it?  You still going to puss out?

JB is a pussy. He'll NEVER agree to this bet.

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On 2/28/2018 at 9:04 AM, Beef said:

LMFAO!!!

In His 9 Months On The Job, Special Counsel Robert Mueller Has Charged 19 People

Carrie Johnson

Less than a year on the job investigating Russian election interference, special counsel Robert Mueller has secured criminal charges against 19 people including five guilty pleas.

AILSA CHANG, HOST: 

Special counsel Robert Mueller has led the legal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election for nine months now. In that time, he's charged 19 people with wrongdoing and one guilty pleas from the president's former deputy campaign manager and his national security adviser. NPR's Carrie Johnson has been comparing the Mueller investigation to similar ones in the past. Here's what she found.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: There's a small group of scholars who focus on politically charged investigations that may lead into the White House. Ken Gormley, the president of Duquesne University, is one of them.

KEN GORMLEY: The whole point of appointing an independent counsel is to deal with the fact that there is a cloud over the highest levels of the executive branch and to restore public confidence one way or the other.

JOHNSON: That means moving forward quietly with no leaks and quickly to prove guilt or innocence and lift that cloud. The model prosecutor, Gormley says, was this guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ARCHIBALD COX: I'm not looking for a confrontation. I've worried a good deal through my life about the problems of imposing too much strain upon our constitutional institutions. And I'm certainly not out to get the president of the United States.

JOHNSON: That's Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox. Cox was fired in 1973 after a little more than a year. But during that time, he developed evidence about obstruction of justice by President Richard Nixon. The prosecutor who replaced Cox built on that work, ultimately leading to Nixon's resignation. Gormley says the current special prosecutor, Robert Mueller, is operating in that same mold.

GORMLEY: Robert Mueller's pace in this investigation is very similar to that of some of the best special prosecutors in modern history.

JOHNSON: But at the White House, President Trump and his lawyers have been pressing the Mueller team to move even faster. So is another familiar figure - former Whitewate independent counsel Ken Starr. Here's Starr speaking to CNN this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KEN STARR: The American people I think want to know; was there collusion? Let's get that answer.

JOHNSON: Starr of course spent five years and more than $40 million investigating President Bill Clinton. Critics say Starr took too long and wandered away from his original mission. Ken Gormley wrote a book about the Starr probe. He explains.

GORMLEY: Some accused some special counsel, like Ken Starr, for instance, of being like roving Frankenstein monsters. There was just no end to their investigations.

JOHNSON: In the category of no end, there was the investigation of Clinton's secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Henry Cisneros, who drew a lot of media attention.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Attorney General Janet Reno asked for an independent counsel to determine whether he should be prosecuted for providing false information about payments to an ex-mistress.

JOHNSON: Cisneros spoke with reporters in 1995 after the probe launched.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

HENRY CISNEROS: I'm disappointed by that outcome, but I'm hopeful that the investigation will be completed expeditiously.

JOHNSON: Any hope Cisneros had for a speedy resolution went bust. The independent counsel in his case, David Barrett, kept working even after the law authorizing his work expired. Cisneros pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was later pardoned by the president. The final report emerged in 2006, nearly 11 years after he took office.

Now, Robert Mueller is a hard-driving former FBI director not known for dallying in his work. He's already secured indictments against Russians for running an information warfare campaign aimed at the presidential election. Katy Harriger studies special prosecutors at Wake Forest University. She says measuring Mueller's success will be a challenge.

KATY HARRIGER: For some people, success will only be if somehow the president gets impeached (laughter). And for other people, success is a sort of complete exoneration.

JOHNSON: Push away that cloud of politics, she says, and success may be a report or a set of conclusions that most people can believe. Carrie Johnson, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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