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jb™

IT'S MUELLER TIME!!!

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You just know Jb is giving Mueller blowjobs. Why else would be be so consumed with the man?

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that last link he provided came from safari.bs,uk

 

LMFO

 

sounds legit lol

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7 hours ago, Shredman said:

that last link he provided came from safari.bs,uk

 

LMFO

 

sounds legit lol

Where?????

This is where the loon is getting his info?

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8 hours ago, Shredman said:

that last link he provided came from safari.bs,uk

 

LMFO

 

sounds legit lol

I didn't realize that was the web address of the Huffington Post.....xD

26 minutes ago, SaintRay said:

Where?????

This is where the loon is getting his info?

You poor bastards need to look at something other than FoxNews or whatever right wing rag for dummies you fools consume.9_9

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5 hours ago, jb™ said:

I didn't realize that was the web address of the Huffington Post.....xD

You poor bastards need to look at something other than FoxNews or whatever right wing rag for dummies you fools consume.9_9

Pretty sure Fox News is more reliable than safari.bs.uk, whatever that even is.

Cue: “UP YOURS WHITE NATIONALIST SCUMBAG!”

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Robert Mueller Ignores Rudy Giuliani's Threats to End Trump-Russia Investigation Before Midterms Deadline

By  

Special counsel Robert Mueller is continuing his probe into Russian interference and possible collusion with the Trump campaign in the 2016 election despite a claim by President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani that the deadline to close it has passed.

Giuliani has stated for weeks that based on Department of Justice guidelines, last Saturday, September 1, was the cutoff for Mueller to complete his investigation before it could affect the outcome of midterm elections taking place on November 6.

“I always thought that was the day to make some decision,” Giuliani said in an interview, according to Bloomberg on Tuesday.

However, Mueller has not responded to Giuliani’s demand, and continues his probe.

Furthermore, Giuliani’s claim may be baseless.

“The whole idea that there’s this magic deadline is ridiculous,” Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor for the U.S. attorney’s office in New York told Bloomberg.

Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now

Giuliani was referencing a 2012 policy memo that former Attorney General Eric Holder issued stating that “prosecutors may never select the timing of investigative steps or criminal charges for the purpose of affecting any election.”

The policy is under review by the Justice Department. “Several department officials described a general principle of avoiding interference in elections rather than a specific time period before an election during which overt investigative steps are prohibited,” a July report by the department’s inspector general states.

No determination has been made as to whether it should be updated, two people familiar with the issue told Bloomberg.

Giuliani, who is against Trump doing a sit-down interview with Mueller because he suspects it could be a trap for committing perjury, also said that such an interview would be “out-of-bounds” and that Mueller would have to subpoena Trump to interview him.

“If he subpoenas us he sets off a legal battle right before the election,” Giuliani opined. “I don’t think he is going to do that.”

 

09_04_18_GiulianiDeadlineRudy Giuliani, former New York City mayor and current lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks to members of the media during a White House Sports and Fitness Day at the South Lawn of the White House May 30, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Giuliani claims the deadline for special counsel Robert Mueller to finish his probe was September 1, 2018. Alex Wong/Getty Images 

Giuliani has made various claims on television that have been undercut by the president and other Trump administration members. Last month, while arguing that Mueller was attempting to get Trump to commit perjury, he said, “truth isn’t truth.” Giuliani later clarified his remark.

John S. Martin, who preceded Giuliani as U.S. Attorney and became a federal judge, told The New Yorker in a story published Monday that Giuliani is “making arguments that don’t hold up” and that “he’s not looking anything like a good lawyer today.”

Giuliani recently claimed he and the rest of Trump’s legal team may invoke executive privilege to prevent Mueller from releasing the final report of his investigation.

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Robert Mueller tells Trump's legal team that he will accept written answers on campaign questions

By Carol Leonnig
 
Robert Mueller tells Trump's legal team that he will accept written answers on campaign questions

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III did not rule out interviewing the president as part of his wide-ranging inquiry. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III told President Trump's lawyers in a letter Friday that he will accept written answers from Trump to questions about whether his campaign coordinated with Russia to tilt the 2016 election in his favor, according to two people briefed on the communication.

Mueller did not rule out interviewing the president as part of his wide-ranging inquiry. His letter indicated that he may revisit his long-running request to pose questions to Trump directly about Russia's activities during the campaign after reviewing his answers.

And the special counsel left open the possibility that he may still try to press Trump in person about a second piece of his investigation: whether the president has sought to block the probe since taking office.

On potential obstruction of justice issues, "he said he'd assess it down the road," said one person familiar with Mueller's letter who requested anonymity to discuss private communications. "They're essentially saying, 'We'll deal with this at a later date.'"

Trump's personal attorneys, Rudolph W. Giuliani and Jay Sekulow, declined to comment. Peter Carr, a spokesman for the special counsel's office, declined to comment.

Mueller's decision to accept at least some written responses represents a concession to Trump's legal team, which since December has resisted the special counsel's efforts to interview the president. In March, Mueller raised the prospect of subpoenaing Trump if he refused to be questioned voluntarily.

Some of Trump's advisors viewed Mueller's new letter as a sign of begrudging acceptance that he would lose a legal battle to compel the president to testify. But others saw it as just another volley in a 10-month-long legal tussle.

The White House counsel's office, led by attorney Emmet Flood, has been girding to fight a subpoena for Trump's testimony under oath. The team has argued that the executive has broad powers he is allowed to exercise without fear of prosecution and without risk of being subject to a grand jury investigation.

In his letter, Mueller did not address whether he had ruled out the idea of subpoenaing Trump or might push for a voluntary interview later. The letter was first reported by the New York Times.

Mueller has been seeking to press Trump about two broad topics: what his campaign knew about efforts by Russian operatives to disrupt the 2016 campaign and whether actions he has taken as president, including the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey, were aimed at thwarting the investigation of Russian interference.

6WDV7UBZ3JCELFVQ52CQYORJ6Y.jpg

Mueller first indicated to Trump's lawyers in December 2017 that he wanted to interview the president in a face-to-face session to complete his investigation. After weeks of back-and-forth, Mueller warned Trump's legal team in a tense March meeting that he could subpoena Trump if he refused to grant an interview voluntarily.

This month, Trump's attorneys rejected Mueller's proposal to ask Trump questions he had about his actions as president and said they would consider having him answer some questions about the campaign period in writing.

Trump's lawyers said that they fear Mueller could accuse Trump of perjury because the president remembers key events differently than other witnesses.

The most important discrepancy relates to a meeting he had with Comey. Giuliani has said Trump does not recall asking Comey to drop an investigation into former national security advisor Michael Flynn, and Giuliani does not want the president to be accused of lying about the episode.

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The Trump-Russia coverup that Democrats fear

By Greg SargentSeptember 10th at 7:20 PM

(Andrew Harnik/AP)

CNN is reporting that top congressional Democrats are planning to take an unexpectedly soft line on new and potentially very damning information that has emerged about Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Russia probe.

Why? Because Democrats understand full well that Sessions, of all people, could end up being pivotal to preventing President Trump from covering up the findings of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation.

It’s a complicated and interesting situation — and it’s unclear where it’s going to end up.

A few days ago, the news broke that in a recent court filing, former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos contradicted Sessions’s previous sworn testimony about how Sessions reacted when Papadopoulos proposed the idea of Trump meeting with Vladimir Putin during the 2016 campaign.

Sessions had told Congress that he “pushed back” on the suggestion. But in the filing, Papadopoulos’s lawyers claimed that in fact, Sessions “appeared to like the idea and stated that the campaign should look into it.”

Now, per CNN, Democrats are holding back in going after Sessions over the discrepancy, because they worry that if they go too hard at Sessions, it could provide Trump with a pretext for firing him. But note why they fear this (emphasis added):

Democrats say they want Sessions to remain in the job because he is recused from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, which Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is overseeing. A new attorney general could take the reins and potentially curtail the Mueller probe — or deny Mueller’s report on the probe from ever being released to the public, they fear.

New York Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the top Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee who questioned Sessions about the meeting last year, told CNN that “right now, I don’t think we want to do anything” about Sessions, worried that a new attorney general could put Mueller’s report “in a safe” to deny making it public.

Because of this, as Nadler put it, “we want him there — for the time being, at least.”

This is a reasonable fear. As I noted the other day, the special-counsel regulations stipulate that Mueller must deliver a confidential report to Rosenstein, and Rosenstein must provide an explanation for the conclusion of the investigation to the bipartisan leaders of the judiciary committees in both chambers. Rosenstein has broad discretion to determine how much information he puts in that explanation.

Trump lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani has said Trump may try to block the transmission of all or parts of that report — which presumably would contain findings on possible collusion, or obstruction of justice, or both — by claiming executive privilege. That probably won’t work. But what could work is that, if Trump fires Sessions and replaces him with a loyalist who does not recuse himself from the investigation, that person could then dramatically limit what’s in that report or what information is specifically transmitted to Congress.

We already know that Trump very well may fire Sessions after the midterm elections. If he does, it’s at least plausible that Trump might try to execute this scenario that Democrats fear.

Then what? Well, as legal expert Andrew Kent laid out to me, at that point the question becomes whether Congress would subpoena a fuller explanation, or subpoena Mueller’s findings in some form, from the Justice Department. But there’s no guarantee that Republicans, should they retain control of both chambers, would do this.

And so, for now at least, Democrats are in the terrible position of having to count on Sessions — and his ongoing recusal — as their best shot at Mueller’s findings seeing the light of day. This, despite the fact that they find Sessions objectionable on so many other fronts, especially concerning the Justice Department’s aggressive pullback when it comes to defending voting and civil rights and exercising oversight of local policing abuses.

But if Trump does fire Sessions, the question of whether Congress ever does try to get Mueller’s findings released in some form could turn on who wins the midterm elections. If Democrats win, they will of course do that — another reminder that a Democratic victory may be the only conceivable way we ever see Trump face something approaching true accountability. As Nadler has now publicly clarified, if this doesn’t happen, Democrats fear the very real possibility of a coverup. For good reason.

Read more:

Greg Sargent: Mueller is planning a report on Trump. Here’s what happens next.

Nelson W. Cunningham: A Mueller report may never see the light of day

Greg Sargent: Giuliani says Trump will try to block Mueller’s report. Could it work?

Jennifer Rubin: Sessions is one reason to flip control of the Senate

Catherine Rampell: When liberals are rooting for Jeff Sessions, you know something’s wrong

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

JB PossumPecker.jpg

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Meanwhile....

 


WMAL radio often has Former US Attorney, Joe DiGenova, on to discuss the weekly updates to the SpyGate saga. Today’s update, September 10, 2018, was rather fruitful, as DiGenova was making a lot of news. 

1. Mueller has told close confidants he was handed “a piece of crap on collusion.” But investigated it further with no fruits. 

2. DiGenova mentions, “James Baker, former FBI General Counsel, is a cooperating witness in a case against James Comey.” 

3. DiGenova says there will be one more indictment related to Lying to the FBI. However “the Mueller Probe is coming to an end with NO indictments about collusion whatsoever.” 

4. DiGenova: “This is going to be a bad next 30 days for a bunch of people in the FBI and DOJ under Obama.” This is in relation to the declassification of the FISA documents for Carter Page which is in processs. 

5. DiGenova also brings up the January 5th, 2017 meeting with Rice, Yates, Biden, Comey, and Obama. He says “[It] was a meeting to discuss how Sally Yates was going to get Michael Flynn. And the President of the United States, Barack Obama, was directly involved in these discussions.” 

6. DiGenova says the Mueller investigation has one more chess piece up their sleeve.  Mueller will soon be drafting a report that tries to make the case against Trump for Obstruction of Justice in the firing of Comey.  That's their last ditch effort, but it won't work.

 

 

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Paul Manafort Reaches Tentative Plea Deal With Robert Mueller’s Team: Reports

Trump’s former campaign chairman had already been convicted of several felonies and was about to face another trial in the special counsel’s investigation.

Paul Manafort makes a call while touring the floor of the Republican National Convention on July 17, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio

Win McNamee via Getty Images

Paul Manafort makes a call while touring the floor of the Republican National Convention on July 17, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

WASHINGTON ― Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has reached a tentative plea deal with the special counsel team led by Robert Mueller, reported ABC News and NPR on Thursday. 

The tentative plea deal reportedly came after Manafort was found guilty last month by a federal jury sitting in northern Virginia on eight counts of tax and bank fraud charges, but ahead of Manafort’s upcoming trial on additional federal charges in the nation’s capital.

CNN, however, described the two sides as coming “close” to a deal on Thursday.

ABC News spotted Manafort and his attorneys entering a secret entrance to the building where Mueller’s office is located on Thursday morning, and the two parties spent more than four hours in there. 

Three sources with knowledge of the discussions told ABC News that the deal is expected to be announced Friday, but it’s unclear whether Manafort has agreed to cooperate with Mueller’s team or will merely concede to a guilty plea. 

Manafort came under scrutiny as part of Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, though most of the charges against him predated his work on the Trump campaign.

Former Manafort associate and Trump campaign deputy Rick Gates testified againsthis former boss at Manafort’s first trial, where prosecutors laid out how Manafort skirted taxes on the money he received from Ukrainian oligarchs through his use of overseas bank accounts. A Trump-supporting juror on the first trial said that a single holdout on the jury prevented Manafort from being convicted on all counts.

The second trial in D.C. would have centered on charges that Manafort was involved in a conspiracy to defraud the United States, that he failed to register as a foreign agent, that he laundered money, that he made false statements and that he tampered with witnesses.

Trump had in the past hinted about pardoning Manafort, and it’s something he discussed with his attorneys. Agreeing to cooperate against the president, of course, will likely squash any hope that Manafort had of receiving a pardon from Trump.

Ryan Reilly is HuffPost’s senior justice reporter covering the Justice Department, federal law enforcement, criminal justice and legal affairs. Have a tip? Reach him at ryan.reilly@huffpost.com or on Signal at 202-527-9261.

Lydia O’Connor contributed reporting.

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13 minutes ago, jb™ said:

Paul Manafort Reaches Tentative Plea Deal With Robert Mueller’s Team: Reports

Trump’s former campaign chairman had already been convicted of several felonies and was about to face another trial in the special counsel’s investigation.

Paul Manafort makes a call while touring the floor of the Republican National Convention on July 17, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio

Win McNamee via Getty Images

Paul Manafort makes a call while touring the floor of the Republican National Convention on July 17, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

WASHINGTON ― Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has reached a tentative plea deal with the special counsel team led by Robert Mueller, reported ABC News and NPR on Thursday. 

The tentative plea deal reportedly came after Manafort was found guilty last month by a federal jury sitting in northern Virginia on eight counts of tax and bank fraud charges, but ahead of Manafort’s upcoming trial on additional federal charges in the nation’s capital.

CNN, however, described the two sides as coming “close” to a deal on Thursday.

ABC News spotted Manafort and his attorneys entering a secret entrance to the building where Mueller’s office is located on Thursday morning, and the two parties spent more than four hours in there. 

Three sources with knowledge of the discussions told ABC News that the deal is expected to be announced Friday, but it’s unclear whether Manafort has agreed to cooperate with Mueller’s team or will merely concede to a guilty plea. 

Manafort came under scrutiny as part of Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, though most of the charges against him predated his work on the Trump campaign.

Former Manafort associate and Trump campaign deputy Rick Gates testified againsthis former boss at Manafort’s first trial, where prosecutors laid out how Manafort skirted taxes on the money he received from Ukrainian oligarchs through his use of overseas bank accounts. A Trump-supporting juror on the first trial said that a single holdout on the jury prevented Manafort from being convicted on all counts.

The second trial in D.C. would have centered on charges that Manafort was involved in a conspiracy to defraud the United States, that he failed to register as a foreign agent, that he laundered money, that he made false statements and that he tampered with witnesses.

Trump had in the past hinted about pardoning Manafort, and it’s something he discussed with his attorneys. Agreeing to cooperate against the president, of course, will likely squash any hope that Manafort had of receiving a pardon from Trump.

Ryan Reilly is HuffPost’s senior justice reporter covering the Justice Department, federal law enforcement, criminal justice and legal affairs. Have a tip? Reach him at ryan.reilly@huffpost.com or on Signal at 202-527-9261.

Lydia O’Connor contributed reporting.

HuffPo? Lol And?

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